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Thread: Head for Canterbury

  1. #1
    MotherBear's Avatar
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    Default Head for Canterbury

    Canty lifestyle lowers mortality
    03 March 2006
    By JANINE BENNETTS

    Canterbury has the second-lowest mortality rate and is one of the healthiest regions in New Zealand, the University of Canterbury has found. By examining New Zealand's mortality records between 1980 and 2001, Canterbury University's GeoHealth Laboratory director Dr Jamie Pearce found health in New Zealand has become geographically polarised.

    "While in some areas life expectancy is increasing, in other areas it's not and some areas have even experienced a small decline. New Zealand has become much more unequal or polarised in terms of health," Pearce said. "What we can say for sure is that the gap between the best and the worst areas is getting bigger when really it shouldn't be."

    The mortality rate measures the number of people dying in a particular area per 100,000 people. Canterbury's mortality rate for 1999-2001 was 694, just higher than the North Island's Waitemata district at 658 and lower than Nelson-Marlborough at 702.

    New Zealand's highest mortality rate was in Tairawhiti, near Gisborne, at 946, followed by the Lakes District at 863 and Wanganui at 863. Pearce said the cause of these geographical inequalities was uncertain but the polarisation of health was reflected by a growth in income inequalities.

    "New Zealand society has big economic and social inequalities and they've actually had a big affect on health," he said. "We also think migration could be important too. What we think is happening is selective migration. People move around and it seems healthy people are moving to healthier areas. Other researchers also think ethnicity is a factor and some of the areas that are not as healthy as others are predominantly Maori."

    Statistics New Zealand principal demographer Mansoor Khawaja said there were several factors that contributed to the regional differences in mortality rates, including socio-economics and ethnicity. Khawaja said regions with a low mortality rate such as Canterbury would have a growing elderly population which lived longer and policies would need to account for that. Having an older population also meant health spending in a region could increase as this growing elderly population would need more health care.
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  2. #2
    netchicken is offline Senior Member
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    Default Head for Canterbury

    Shush!

    Don't tell everyone, all the sickies will move here.

    Considering the wonderful landscape in terms of outdoors activities and the vibrant sporting culture of the city its really no suprise.

    I was out cycling on Wednesday and was amazed that during the day there were so many people in groups walking, hiking cycling etc in the Port hills. I saw at least 3 groups of retired people with packs on and walking sticks up in the hills as well.

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