Results 1 to 5 of 5

Thread: Cost of Living (Internet, Cable, Phone, Etc.) & Random Questions

  1. #1
    jrotunda85 is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    6

    Post Cost of Living (Internet, Cable, Phone, Etc.) & Random Questions

    Alright got a bunch of questions for you all concerning the cost of living and general questions about New Zealand. First, in terms of the cost of living, I was wondering how much you all pay (in NZ $) for the following services – and if you could elaborate on them at all (e.g. 600 minutes for $X, etc).

    • Internet Access at Home
    • TV (I understand you get 4? Channels for free, if I want to get more what is the cost?)
    • Cell Phone Service and/or Home Phone Service
    • Beer & Liquor


    Also, I am interested in asking a few “stupid” questions, here they go!

    • I see most rents done on a weekly basis, does this mean you actually pay the landlord on a weekly basis or do you pay 4X that amount once a month?
    • How do most employers in NZ pay their employees? For example, direct deposit or check? And how often? Weekly, bi-weekly, monthly, etc.
    • If I am granted PR I assume taxes are withheld from my paycheck each pay period. Does this mean I am eligible to use the healthcare system in NZ or do I have to be a citizen?



    I think that’s it for now, thank you all so much for answering!

  2. #2
    1happywoman's Avatar
    1happywoman is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Kawakawa, NZ, formerly Cincinnati, Ohio, USA
    Posts
    163
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default

    I can answer some of your questions. Roughly, everything here seems to be about twice what it is in the states. I was very much in sticker shock the first few times I went to the grocery store. But, again, you are on an island nation so resources are not the same. I believe Woolworth's (New Zealand) has a website where you can see the prices of items. (Not the same as Woolworth's in the US.) As for internet access at home, a bit of that will depend on where you live. We moved from just outside of Hamilton last December (out in dairy farm country)and could only get dial-up internet access about 25 minutes outside of town. Cell phone service can be quite expensive, and you will find most people do a lot of text messaging. There just isn't the competition there is in the states. I have a plan now that allows me to make unlimited calls to one person on the same system, for $6 a month. (Obviously, I don't know as many people here, so no need for a more expansive plan presently). It seems to be getting a little better with some other providers coming in, but still nothing like what I had in the states. (I had a local plan where I had 2000 'anytime' minutes per month of phone time, unlimited texting, and a Wifi phone, and since we had wireless in our house, not to mention just about everywhere I went, I rarely made a dent in that 2000 minutes - $60 a month for that plan. Sigh.)

    Presently, pretrol (gas) here on the east side of Hamilton is $1.62.9 per liter ( 4 liters is about a gallon.)

    I flat with a person, and in a previous situation, it is set up so the rent is paid weekly. That's just how it's done here, for the most part. As for pay, I work for Waikato hospital, and we are paid bi-weekly, and I have direct deposit. I have worked for a temp agency in the past and they paid weekly, but it was understandable in that situation.

    When you are working in this country, you must have an IRD (Inland Revenue Department)number, because if you are working, whether a resident or not, you will be paying taxes. It is my understanding that if you don't have an IRD number, you pay very high rates. But you can't access the health care system (other than for emergency treatment) unless you are a resident or citizen; otherwise you can be billed for services. In the meantime, you can purchase private insurance if you want. You can also see a general practitioner, and pay for the visits. I have to see one out of necessity, and I pay $55 a visit which I don't think is totally unreasonable. Also, if you are used to having dental insurance available routinely, you won't find that here (at least I haven't). People complain about the cost of services, but having taken care of my teeth religiously in the states, I haven't found paying for a cleaning and exam every 6 months to be all that expensive. (There isn't quite the same emphasis on preventative care here as in the US, whether dental or medical.) Be sure you bring copies of your medical records and your lastest dental x-rays. The first time I saw a dentist here, she was very impressed that I had my x-rays with me and it gave her a baseline so she could evaluate whether things had changed.

    Have you given any thoughts on how you will get around when you get here? If you are planning on driving, I can tell you first hand that it takes some time for your brain to adjust to driving a right side drive vehicle on the left side of the road. And they have a different road rule or two here, as well. Roundabouts take a little getting used to. I remember taking care of one very lucky young man here on holiday, from the states, who decided he would pop out to a store one night by himself, and made a right turn on to the road - directly into the path of an oncoming truck.(He looked to his left, as you would, saw nothing coming from that direction, so turned right.) His reflex was to steer to the right, so the truck sheared off the passenger side of the car, and he only wound up with a broken finger - and a demolished rental car. Oh, and you won't find road signs here like in the US. You know how you see those big green and white signs every few miles that tell you how many more miles to the upcoming cities? I haven't seen many of those types of signs here. But my experience is also limited as far as traveling around the country.

    I can only tell you my experiences, but I'm sure more people will chime in and correct me if I'm wrong.
    Arrived in Auckland on August 6, 2008.Now live in Kawakawa with my kiwi partner.
    I just started working at Bay of Islands Hospital at the beginning of December 2009.
    Work permit renewed and good until June 2010
    EOI submitted and selected, case manager assigned and ITA received. PR application submitted 28/08/09
    approved in principle 26/01/10, PR granted and received 19/03/10

  3. #3
    MotherBear's Avatar
    MotherBear is offline The missing link
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    currently Ras al Khaimah, UAE, ex Wales, UK
    Posts
    11,180
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default

    Great post 1HW.

    Quote Originally Posted by 1happywoman View Post
    But you can't access the health care system (other than for emergency treatment) unless you are a resident or citizen; otherwise you can be billed for services.
    I believe you can get the same level of healthcare if you hold a long term work permit, too.
    Mother Bear

    Try to bloom wherever you are planted.

  4. #4
    1happywoman's Avatar
    1happywoman is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Kawakawa, NZ, formerly Cincinnati, Ohio, USA
    Posts
    163
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default

    Eligibility for Publicly Funded Health and Disability Services
    Guide to Eligibility

    Ineligible people
    Eligibility:
    People who do not meet any of the criteria are not eligible for publicly funded health and disability services.


    Criteria
    People are ineligible if they are NOT:


    New Zealand citizens
    New Zealand Residence Permit holders with a Returning Resident's Visa, or who have been living in New Zealand for two or more years immediately before receiving a health or disability services
    Australian citizens or permanent residents who have been living, or who intend to live, in New Zealand for two years or longer
    refugees, or people whose application to become a refugee has been accepted by Immigration, or people who are in the process of having an appeal to the Refugee Status Appeal Authority determined
    pregnant wives or partners of eligible people, who require maternity-related services
    children and young people aged 18 or under who are in the care and control of a parent or guardian (or a person in the process of legally adopting them) and that person is:


    a New Zealand citizen or permanent resident, OR
    an Australian citizen or permanent resident who has been living, or who intends to live, in New Zealand for two years or longer, OR
    a Work Permit holders whose permit is for two years or more, or who has a current work permit which, together with previous permits, allows them to be continuously in New Zealand for two years or more, OR
    a student or visitor who has had consecutive Permits to re-enter or remain in New Zealand since before 29 October 2003
    Work Permit holders whose permit is for two years or more, or who have a current work permit which, together with previous permits, allows them to be continuously in New Zealand for two years or more
    NZAID Overseas Development Assistance (ODA) scholarship holders, or their partners, or their dependent children aged 18 years or under, provided they also meet any conditions imposed under the ODA scheme
    participants in the Ministry of Education’s Foreign Language Teaching Assistantship scheme
    Commonwealth scholarship holders
    in prison or receiving compulsory treatment
    students who have had consecutive Permits to re-enter or remain in New Zealand since before 30 October 2003
    needing services covered by the reciprocal agreements with Australia or the United Kingdom
    People are ineligible if they are:


    foreign diplomats posted to New Zealand, or members of their family.
    Recommendation
    The Government strongly recommends that people in New Zealand who are not eligible for publicly funded health services hold comprehensive travel insurance, including health insurance.
    From the Ministry of Health Website. (I think this could have been worded a little better.)
    Arrived in Auckland on August 6, 2008.Now live in Kawakawa with my kiwi partner.
    I just started working at Bay of Islands Hospital at the beginning of December 2009.
    Work permit renewed and good until June 2010
    EOI submitted and selected, case manager assigned and ITA received. PR application submitted 28/08/09
    approved in principle 26/01/10, PR granted and received 19/03/10

  5. #5
    MotherBear's Avatar
    MotherBear is offline The missing link
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    currently Ras al Khaimah, UAE, ex Wales, UK
    Posts
    11,180
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default

    Will you be eligible for publicly funded health care in New Zealand?

    People holding work permits for a stay of two years or more (and their dependent children) are eligible for publicly-funded health and disability services. Other work permit holders generally are not eligible.


    Which is basically what it says within your last-but-one paragraph.
    Mother Bear

    Try to bloom wherever you are planted.

Similar Threads

  1. Living cost in Timaru
    By Zenji in forum General NZ Chat
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 13-06-2008, 04:53 AM
  2. Cost of Living comparisons
    By andyainuk in forum General NZ Chat
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 12-05-2008, 11:00 AM
  3. Cost of Living
    By stevejan in forum General NZ Chat
    Replies: 29
    Last Post: 31-10-2005, 07:29 AM
  4. cost of living, taxes etc.
    By wolfgang in forum The Coffee House
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 15-05-2005, 06:44 PM
  5. My New Cost of Living & Cost of Shopping Calculators
    By SteveNetWriter in forum General NZ Chat
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 11-10-2004, 12:11 AM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46