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Thread: The teaching bachelors...which one?

  1. #1
    xueli is offline Junior Member
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    Default The teaching bachelors...which one?

    Well, I have some questions regarding the bachelors offered by different universities in NZ.

    Most univerisities offer Bach. of Education and Bach. of Teaching(primary/secondary/...etc.).
    What's the different between them? In order to be a teacher, which one is more suitable? Can I teach secondary with Bach. of Education?

    Some say that it is the best to get a bach. in something else first (like Bach. of Science/Art/....etc.) then get another graduate diploma in teaching. But this surely will take a longer time before I can get a teaching post...(then why should I spend so much time if i can teach with a bach. of education/teaching?)

    Please help and give advices...desperately needing them......

  2. #2
    RisenAshes's Avatar
    RisenAshes is offline Member
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    It does look like its a matter of time.

    A normal BA or BSc would be three years, and a graduate diploma in education would be another one year. Making 4 years in total. The benefits of this are that you can specialise in your teaching field, and you only have to to do teaching practise in your fourth year. Another benefit is that you are not bound to a teaching as your only career, you could use your BA/Bsc for something else in the future.

    A Bachelor of Education, if I'm not mistaken is a four year degree, and is an honours equivalent degree. It is rated at level 7 I think

    A Bachelor of Teaching is only three years, and might also be rated as a level 7.

    If you are thinking of salary, all three would start you at the same level, but in terms of international recognition, I would go for the BEd (Bachelor of Education).

    If time is not on your side, then the Bachelor of Teaching would be the best bet for you.

  3. #3
    xueli is offline Junior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by RisenAshes View Post
    It does look like its a matter of time.

    A normal BA or BSc would be three years, and a graduate diploma in education would be another one year. Making 4 years in total. The benefits of this are that you can specialise in your teaching field, and you only have to to do teaching practise in your fourth year. Another benefit is that you are not bound to a teaching as your only career, you could use your BA/Bsc for something else in the future.

    A Bachelor of Education, if I'm not mistaken is a four year degree, and is an honours equivalent degree. It is rated at level 7 I think

    A Bachelor of Teaching is only three years, and might also be rated as a level 7.

    If you are thinking of salary, all three would start you at the same level, but in terms of international recognition, I would go for the BEd (Bachelor of Education).

    If time is not on your side, then the Bachelor of Teaching would be the best bet for you.
    What a difficult decision to make......I will discuss it with my parents first...

    what are the levels for? The rankings of the Bachelors? And what are the 'points' of the bachelors? some 200+points some even higher....

  4. #4
    RisenAshes's Avatar
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    Essentially, the levels inidcate the complexity of the degree. The higher the level, the more complex. It is used to show the education level of the person who has it. The payroll service uses these levels to determine your salary when you are a teacher. Depending on your level, you will be given a specific salary. For obvious reasons, you would want a degree at level 7 and not level 6, because then you would start out at a higher salary. And as I said before, all three options for you are level 7.

    The points system that the university lays out goes towards helping NZQA determine what level the degree might be on. It is quite possible that one university's bachelor of teaching might only be level 6 because of the number of points it gives you, whereas another university might have a bachelor of teaching that is at level 7.

    One thing that I have to make very clear is that you ask your prospective university which NQF level your degree will be accredited to so that you don't come up short in terms of salary.

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