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Thread: citizenship vs residency? the basics needed

  1. #1
    heidi is offline Member
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    Default citizenship vs residency? the basics needed

    Hi I've searched everywhere but can't find the answer to this. I'm having trouble understanding the basics! Sorry if my questions are really mundane!

    Do I have the steps right?
    1 submit EOI
    2 hopefully receive ITA
    3 apply for residency
    4 obtain residency
    5 is that residency conditional for a number of yrs before it is permanent?

    Once permanent do you still need a RRV to travel overseas and get back in?
    What other common restrictions are there for a permanent resident?

    Is there an age restriction on a perm resident if they want to apply for citizenship?

    Are there any big advantages to becoming a citizen ?

    I am having a hard time convincing DH to give up the golden handcuffs of his government job here to move to the other side of the world and take a pay cut as a teacher...he did it for me once before and it didn't work out...I'm hoping that by doing alot of research into the risks I'll be more confident in assuring him (or failing that resigned to the possibility he may be right)

  2. #2
    kokopeli is offline God like figure
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    Hi Heidi,

    Your basic outline of the steps is pretty much right. I don't know very much about Working Visas, but this is what generally happens if you apply for Permanent Residency. I'm sure someone who knows about Working Visas will join in later....

    If you are granted Permanent Residency, you will get a Residency Visa. This is a blue sticker in your passport and will allow you to enter New Zealand to live and work.

    When you arrive in NZ, you will be issued with a Residence Permit (a stamp in your passport) that allows you to reside in NZ indefinately.

    When you get your Residency Visa, you will also get a temporary Returning Resident's Vias or RRV. This will allow you to re-enter New Zealand if you have to leave and want to come back. The temporary RRV lasts for two years from the day you get your Residency Permit (ie, when you actually land in NZ).

    If you live in NZ for 184 days of the first year and 184 days of the second year after you first arrive, you can apply for a Permanent Returning Resident's Visa. This will allow you to come and go indefinately.

    Once you have lived in NZ for 5 years, you may want to apply for Citizenship. You'll have to pay (of course) and will be issued with a passport that confirms your status as a New Zealand national. One perceived advantage of this is that NZ nationals can live and work in Australia without having to apply for a visa. Another is that you can travel on your original passport or your Kiwi passport, which may reduce the hassle when you try to get in or leave different countries.

    I know plenty of people who moved to NZ years ago, but haven't bothered to become citizens. Others do it as soon as they are eligible. I'm sure someone else will think of other advantages and disadvantages, but hope that helps for now.

  3. #3
    MotherBear's Avatar
    MotherBear is offline The missing link
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    I've just posted this link on another thread. It explains very simply what happens when you submit an EOI. This is another one explaining the process.

    With regard to your question no. 5, it can happens sometimes that INZ grant you a Work to Residence Visa rather than PR and, with this, you have to work for 2 years in your job on a Work Permit and, all being well, after that your application for PR should go through. If you are granted straight residency without any conditions that's it unless you do something very bad and get chucked out of the country or you scarper from the country and your RRV lapses (after 2 years) due to lack of commitment to NZ.

    There's also something where you're granted PR but with a Sec. 18A clause attached. This means you have to work in your job for 3 months after which the clause will be removed.
    Mother Bear

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  4. #4
    macfod's Avatar
    macfod is offline Oh Masterful One
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    Default my take on this

    We have been told that once we have run our business for two years in a positive manner then they will help us with our residency application.
    At this stage our two years of trading has 17 months and five days to run

    Then we will breath a sigh of relief and think back the past four years and the planning and heartache to get here.



    I will give an update soon on our first ten months in NZ...SOON!

  5. #5
    heidi is offline Member
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    Default thanks!

    Thanks everyone for your input!!

    This site has been so informative!

    So residency and permant residency are the same thing from what I understand for your posts (just counting the hoops we'd have to jump through lol)

    We were in nz 7 yrs ago on a work permit and we wouldn't go that route again, everything that could go wrong did go wrong in the 6 months we were there ... and now I perceive that residency seems to offer a better safety net but if I'm wrong I'd like to find out before going to all the trouble!

    I have read that certain gov't jobs are only open to citizens and that only kids with citizenship can apply for scholarships.

    I'm sure I'll be coming up with a million other questions as I process all this!

    Thanks so much again!!

  6. #6
    KiwiHopeful's Avatar
    KiwiHopeful is offline God like figure
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    Quote Originally Posted by heidi View Post
    I have read that certain gov't jobs are only open to citizens and that only kids with citizenship can apply for scholarships.
    I found this, thanks to Google:

    Our citizenship is valuable. While many of the benefits of citizenship are available to permanent residents, there are some benefits that are only available to citizens, including:
    # the right to enter and remain in New Zealand at any time;
    # the right to travel on a New Zealand passport;
    # the right to obtain assistance from New Zealand embassies and consulates when travelling overseas;
    # the ability to stand as a candidate in local and general elections.

    In addition, some educational scholarships and some public sector jobs are only open to New Zealand citizens, and only citizens can represent New Zealand in some international sport.
    Of course, that doesn't come from an official gov't website, so take it with a grain of salt.
    EOI Submitted: July 20, 2006
    EOI Selected: August 2, 2006
    ITA Received: October 12, 2006
    ITA Submitted: February 2, 2007
    Migrant Levy Paid & Visas Shipped: June 6, 2007
    Arrived in NZ: July 26th, 2007
    Leaving NZ: June 1st, 2008

  7. #7
    Grimace is offline Junior Member
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    Unhappy Living in New Zealand Time

    My partner has been on a working Visa for a number of years, and has just been selected in the ballot for residency.

    Does the time she has been living in New Zealand count towards the 5 years before she can apply to be a citizen, or does the timer start from being granted residency ??

  8. #8
    MotherBear's Avatar
    MotherBear is offline The missing link
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    Hi Grimace and ,

    Unfortunately the clock starts ticking when she gets her PR. It almost tells you she could apply for citizenship after living legally in NZ for 5 years which your partner may or may not have been, but then goes on to remind us that being a PR holder comes into the equation.

    New citizenship requirements

    New citizenship requirements came into effect in April 2005. As a result, you may need to have lived in legally in New Zealand for five years (formerly three years) before applying for citizenship, depending on when you were granted residence. For official New Zealand Government information on citizenship requirements, visit the Department of Internal Affairs website.


    You can read up about citizenship here.
    Mother Bear

    Try to bloom wherever you are planted.

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