Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 11

Thread: Supermarket strike

  1. #1
    MotherBear's Avatar
    MotherBear is offline The missing link
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    currently Ras al Khaimah, UAE, ex Wales, UK
    Posts
    11,180
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default Supermarket strike


    Supermarket strike bites
    30 August 2006
    By JANINE BENNETTS



    Allegations of elaborate public relations campaigns, dirty tactics and straight-out lies are the latest shots fired amid escalating tensions between striking workers and the managers of an Australasian supermarket giant. About 500 workers at Progressive Enterprises Ltd's nationwide distribution centres supplying Foodtown, Countdown and Woolworths supermarkets have been on strike since Friday morning over a pay and holiday dispute.

    Many shelves in Progressive Enterprises supermarkets were yesterday bare after picketers stopped any dry goods from being delivered to or from warehouses. The National Distribution Union's national secretary Laila Harre said the company was stocking supermarket shelves from elsewhere.

    'We have received information the company has contracted (an) outside company to handle distribution, which is, in our view, blatantly illegal,' Harre said. 'They seem to be running a PR strategy, not a bargaining strategy.'

    Progressive's full-page newspaper adverts, which ran in yesterday's Press and other papers, 'were full of lies' Harre said. 'This company seems to want to fight dirty. Frankly, they deserve to lose customer support from their actions.'

    Progressive Enterprises Limited (PEL), which holds about 45 per cent of New Zealand's grocery market, was on Monday forced to indefinitely suspend operations at distribution sites in Christchurch, Auckland and Palmerston North. Just under half of PEL's products go through the centres and the company has had to arrange for supermarkets to order dry goods directly from suppliers.

    PEL managing director Marty Hamnett said that while some suppliers had made deliveries yesterday, it would be extremely difficult to maintain normal stock levels during the strike.

    'It won't be easy going forward,' Hamnett said. 'It's going to be a real test for our store staff. We have stock beginning to flow to stores directly from suppliers and that amount will start to increase as we get further into the week.' He said staff and customers had been very understanding in difficult circumstances.

    The protesting workers are demanding wage increases and a national collective agreement for all three distribution centres. The company on Monday locked out striking workers and will not let them back to work unless they give up their demands.

    Nearly 100 workers continued to picket outside the Christchurch distribution centre in Halswell yesterday. Police were called to the site at 4.30am when protesters mobbed a management vehicle that was attempting to take a former union worker across the picket line.

    Engineering, Printing and Manufacturing Union representative Wayne Ruscoe said that the management vehicle had driven aggressively at protesters. He had laid a complaint with police.

    Christchurch centre union delegate Darren Johnson said morale was high at the picket line despite the company getting 'heavy-handed' earlier in the morning. He said it was unclear what PEL's plans for mediation were.

    Hamnett said PEL had approached mediation services and he hoped mediation would get underway as soon as possible. 'It will only be resolved when the union decides to move on from their 30 per cent wage rise they're asking for.'

    The Council of Trade Unions yesterday called on all unions to get behind locked-out PEL workers and avoid handling goods that would have been processed by strikers.
    Mother Bear

    Try to bloom wherever you are planted.

  2. #2
    Daisyspop's Avatar
    Daisyspop is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    169

    Default Supermarket strike

    Shelves are emptying in the affected stores and PacNsave, who are the cheapest anyway, are having a field day. Swings and roundabouts and all that.

  3. #3
    MotherBear's Avatar
    MotherBear is offline The missing link
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    currently Ras al Khaimah, UAE, ex Wales, UK
    Posts
    11,180
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default Supermarket strike


    Strike shows on store shelves
    31 August 2006
    By SUE ALLEN

    Shoppers can expect more empty supermarket shelves after talks between striking distribution workers and their employer ended in deadlock. Negotiations between Australian-owned supermarket chain Progressive Enterprises and union officials ended after three hours yesterday. Each side blamed the other for the breakdown.

    National Distribution Union leader Laila Harre said Progressive's attitude to talks was 'outrageous'. 'They just didn't engage.'

    Progressive Enterprises managing director Marty Hamnett replied that the union was being lethargic in trying to reach a solution. 'We believe there is a better way to resolve the situation and all we ask is that they come back to work and agree to negotiate the three separate contracts that are in place.'

    About 500 workers at Progressive's nationwide distribution centres supplying Foodtown, Countdown, Woolworths, Super Value and Fresh Choice supermarkets have been on strike since Friday morning over a pay and holiday dispute.

    They are demanding wage increases and a national collective agreement for the three distribution centres, which are in Auckland, Palmerston North and Christchurch. On Monday, the company locked out striking workers. It will not let them back to work unless they cease their demands.

    With the strike entering its sixth day, gaps are beginning to show on supermarket shelves as dry goods run out and cannot be restocked from the company's distribution centres.

    Shelves at one Woolworths store in Wellington were thinly stocked yesterday. Some brands of bottled drinks, noodles, cereals, biscuits, rice, toilet paper, lollies, baby food and cat food were running low or had been cleaned out. But most shoppers who spoke to The Dominion Post said they could get what they wanted.

    Brian Stallard, of Miramar, said he had heard that the supermarket was out of stock in some things, but he had got everything he needed. When asked if he agreed with the strike, Mr Stallard said the workers obviously had their reasons. 'These supermarkets aren't going broke, are they?'

    A shopper at another Woolworths supermarket was told by staff that some deliveries had not arrived and some products were likely to be rationed.

    Ms Harre said the union was seeking an injunction to stop Progressive Enterprises engaging an outside company to handle distribution. A hearing would be held today to see if that injunction would be granted, she said.

    Progressive has denied the claim, saying it has asked suppliers to deliver directly to supermarkets and that they were making their own arrangements to do that.
    Mother Bear

    Try to bloom wherever you are planted.

  4. #4
    fisheress's Avatar
    fisheress is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    233

    Default Supermarket strike

    Have just got in from Foodtown.................very empty!!!
    Hubbie will be disappointed as I couldn't get his Heinz beans.

    I lived on Watties beans while he was in the UK as they're cheaper.............but they do taste nasty. Hubby was not impressed. Quote: 'I haven't moved all the way to the other side of the world to eat crap beans!'

    Ah well.............it'll have to be no beans

    Fisheress

  5. #5
    Welshgirl's Avatar
    Welshgirl is offline Super Moderator
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Hamilton, New Zealand
    Posts
    1,578
    Blog Entries
    5

    Default Supermarket strike

    Hmm, that explains why the shelves were empty in Foodtown :icon_rolleyes:

    fisheress - isn't Watties Heinz, the same as Streets is Walls (as in ice-cream) and Rexona is Sure (the deodrant)?..... :-k

    Still, crap beans are a small price to pay for the other joys NZ has to offer :icon_mrgreen:

  6. #6
    fisheress's Avatar
    fisheress is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    233

    Default Supermarket strike

    They are and they aren't....................Foodtown sell Heinz and Watties........Heinz being the English recipe.

    Beanz Beanz good for the heart
    The more you eat the more you.........

    Fisheress

  7. #7
    MotherBear's Avatar
    MotherBear is offline The missing link
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    currently Ras al Khaimah, UAE, ex Wales, UK
    Posts
    11,180
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default Re: Supermarket strike


    Stocks hold as shop row enters its 11th day

    Monday September 4, 2006
    By David Eames

    Supermarkets in Auckland were managing for the most part to keep shelves stocked yesterday, despite a distribution workers' strike that is now into its 11th day with no end in sight. ?Talks between unions representing 600 locked-out distribution workers based in Auckland, Christchurch and Palmerston North and Australian employer Progressive finished on Saturday night without a settlement.

    The industrial action has led to volatile scenes on picket lines, causing Progressive's managing director Marty Hamnett to appeal for calm. His call came following an alleged "incident of assault and aggressive behaviour" by union members outside a Christchurch supermarket. But in a statement released yesterday, union national secretary Laila Harre said the pickets would continue, "to prevent the use of illegal replacement labour and to inform supermarket customers about the issues".

    Meanwhile, Auckland's central-city supermarkets yesterday appeared to be bearing up to the strike, though some gaps were developing. ?In Woolworths Grey Lynn, kilogram bags of sugar were looking depleted, and aluminium and plastic wraps were also going fast.

    One pair of Saturday-evening revellers were having trouble finding certain items of "recovery food", particularly soda and bottled water. Potato chips were in short supply, as were corn chips and certain brands of chocolate bar.

    Anyone planning on enjoying tacos for dinner last night would have had to be quick, and some worrying gaps were appearing in the mid-range chardonnay and pinot noir shelves. ?Beer supplies appeared to be holding out.

    The situation appeared to be the same in other Progressive-supplied supermarkets, including Foodtown branches downtown and in Grey Lynn. ?At Grey Lynn Foodtown, Kristen Rasmussen, a Mt Albert shopper, reckoned the strike had saved her as much as $50 on the weekly shop, but she was preparing herself for some moans from the kids.

    A shortage of Coca-Cola and other soft drinks was "a major", she said, as was the absence of another "two or three things". ?A first time shopper at Grey Lynn, Renee of Papatoetoe, said the situation was similar in South Auckland supermarkets, with "a bit of everything" in short supply.

    Ms Harre, a former Cabinet minister, said negotiators failed at the weekend to set a date for more talks aimed at ending the deadlock.

    At stake

    The workers want equal pay rates and all existing allowances combined into a site allowance, an 8 per cent pay rise and an extra week's service leave. ?Progressive is refusing to allow the employees to return to work until they give up a claim for a national collective agreement.

    - NZPA
    Mother Bear

    Try to bloom wherever you are planted.

  8. #8
    MotherBear's Avatar
    MotherBear is offline The missing link
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    currently Ras al Khaimah, UAE, ex Wales, UK
    Posts
    11,180
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default Re: Supermarket strike


    Lock out tests loyal supermarket customers
    18 September 2006
    By HELEN HARVEY and FAIRFAX

    One supermarket's loss is another's gain. As the shelves at Woolworths thin out during the distribution workers' dispute, some of its shoppers are heading to greener pastures at New World. This is what the Manawatu Standard discovered in an early weekend check of the shelves at a couple of city supermarkets.

    We wanted to see whether people are still able to buy their groceries at their first-choice stores or whether a dearth of goodies is forcing them to change allegiance.

    At Woolworths, the checkout operators were cheerfully trotting out the party line that their shelves were still full and there was only a few things they couldn't get. And at first glance that appeared to be true apart from a few gaps most of the shelves were covered with products.

    The clue that all was not as it seems was the number of little white notices apologising that a favourite product was not available. Curiously though, goods were lined up in rows above each note. Take the tinned fruit. Tins of peaches were standing side by side all along the shelf, looking for all the world to be packed in.

    But appearances can be deceiving. First the peaches were only one row deep, secondly they were spread along a number of apology notes. Anyone not liking peaches were out of luck.

    But all was not lost. One loyal shopper filled her trolley, determined to keep the faith. "It's good here," she said. "They're nice and always pack the bags for shoppers. They are trying hard and at the end of the day it's not their fault."

    At Woolworths a checkout operator said things had been "dead as", while over at New World the word was it had been "like Christmas". Former Woollies stalwart Anne Moretti was stocking up at New World because "the shelves are full".

    But it is only a temporary defection. She will go back to her old shopping ground once the lockout is over because it is closer to home. She supports the workers, she said, and always toots them when she drives past.

    Meanwhile, delegates from three Australian unions are travelling to New Zealand to support locked out Progressive Enterprises distribution workers.

    Six union members, from the Maritime Union of Australia, the Transport Workers' Union and the Rail, Tram and Bus Union were to arrive in Auckland this afternoon, and will be joining the picket lines for the next two weeks.

    The three Australian unions have raised $15,000 for the locked-out New Zealanders, National Distribution Union secretary Laila Harre said.

    "The workers have been overwhelmed by the level of local and international support for their cause. The collections fall well short of replacing their usual earnings but they do make a big difference." More than 500 workers are involved in the industrial action, which began on August 25.

    Ms Harre said yesterday the union would be challenging the lawfulness of the lockout at an Employment Court hearing scheduled for tomorrow in Auckland.

    - Manawatu Standard
    Mother Bear

    Try to bloom wherever you are planted.

  9. #9
    MotherBear's Avatar
    MotherBear is offline The missing link
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    currently Ras al Khaimah, UAE, ex Wales, UK
    Posts
    11,180
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default Re: Supermarket strike

    Relief for locked-out supermarket workers
    6.45pm Thursday September 21, 2006
    By Chris Ormond

    Victories were claimed today by both the union representing locked-out supermarket distribution workers and their employers after a bitter month-long pay dispute finally ended. The National Distribution Union, representing over 500 workers, won pay parity across the three distribution centres in Auckland, Palmerston North and Christchurch for supermarkets owned by Australian company Progressive Enterprises.

    The union did not get its wish of one collective agreement for all three centres but its secretary Laila Harre said the terms were the same. "It's not a major issue from our point of view. This is a national collective agreement in all but name. The most important thing for these workers was using their national bargaining power to deliver equal pay for equal work and they've done a stunning job of that," she said.

    Progressive managing director Marty Hamnett said it was not logical to agree to one collective when there were operational disparities between the three sites. He said the pay rise amounted to an average of 4.5 per cent across the board each year for a term of three years and that getting the three-year term was an important achievement.

    "It means we can really start forward planning in a clear and proactive way, which is very difficult to do if you've got a 12 month agreement."

    Ms Harre said the dispute had been taxing on the workers and it would take a long time before trust was established with their employer. "Less than a year after coming into New Zealand this company has provoked the biggest industrial dispute of our generation and it will take time to heal those wounds," she said. "The company's conduct has been disgraceful to its workers over the last four weeks."

    She said Progressive had brought "enormous damage" to its own bottom line and devastation to the bottom line of its distribution staff. "They have had to concede on the one thing that they said they would not deliver in bargaining, and that is equal pay for equal work across the three sites."

    Mr Hamnett said while it was concerning not having been able to deliver all its products to retailers, he was surprised how well businesses held up in support of the suppliers.

    Progressive employed over 18,000 staff and in real terms the 500 or so workers in question was a small percentage. "They were more or less holding the other 18,000 to ransom. So I think you'll find the huge percentage of staff who don't work in the warehouses probably are saying it's about time they went back to work."

    Ms Harre said the workers would be pleased to get a pay cheque and pay rise next week. "There will be some back pay in it for them and the company has agreed to forward an interest-free thousand dollar loan which will help them get back on their feet. It's a great victory for these workers and they can go back in with the head held high."

    Council of Trade Unions president Ross Wilson said Progressive had underestimated the huge level of public support and its tactics were cynical and brutal. "Progressive pursued a deliberate strategy of starving into submission vulnerable workers who were using the proper legal processes to improve their wages. It has highlighted a fundamental weakness in our employment laws," Mr Wilson said.

    - NZPA
    Mother Bear

    Try to bloom wherever you are planted.

  10. #10
    MotherBear's Avatar
    MotherBear is offline The missing link
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    currently Ras al Khaimah, UAE, ex Wales, UK
    Posts
    11,180
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default Re: Supermarket strike

    Nothing to do with strikes, but everything to do with supermarkets. Well, Pak n Save, anyway. :D

    Pak'N Save ditches mailers for big event
    Thursday September 21, 2006
    By Martha McKenzie-Minifie

    Cut-price supermarket chain Pak'N Save will continue to develop the "event-based" advertising that last year replaced its product-and-price mailers.

    Mark Baker, retail operations general manager of Foodstuffs, which owns Pak'N Save, said the shift from mailers was made last year after a national review. Baker said Pak'N Save now ran advertised "events" about once a month based on categories, such as wine, meat and produce, instead of advertising products and prices. The strategy would be further developed to include back to school, Easter and Mother's Day events, he said.

    But the Business Herald was contacted by a reader "frustrated" that the supermarket pulled its advertising showing products and prices. "In my household, we have traditionally looked at specials [and] did our weekly shopping according to what was on special."

    Media Design School's David Bell said the shift in advertising strategy could pay off if it convinced shoppers the chain was the cheapest. "As long as Pak'N Save can consistently maintain their no frills brand values, in the long run, it shouldn't matter that their ads don't feature prices," said Bell. "I think low prices as a blanket policy is a far more attractive brand-building message than a short term, obviously loss-leader style price reduction. I guess the real question is, can event-based ads alone do this?"

    The supermarket chain's events ads carry simple messages - such as Wine Sale Now On - and do not give details of the products on special. Customers wanting specific information had complained about the change.

    "Some people write in and say 'I know you've got a wine sale, that's all good, but have you got my Morton Estate on?'," said Baker. "We're saying 'come and find out'." The approach allowed flexibility for different stores to discount different goods, he said.

    The supermarket was known for having low prices, said Baker, and did not see a downturn in customers after stopping the product flyers. "We certainly have no intention to go back to product and price," he said. "All the events seem to hit the mark, we get a good lift in sales."

    Pak'N Save introduced TV to its media mix when it launched the events-based campaign but, with reduced letterbox spending, its ad budget remained steady, said Baker. It also ran full-page print ads, particularly in community newspapers with high readership.

    Foodstuffs spent about $74 million on advertising in the year to June 30, according to Nielsen Media Research advertising information services, making it the nation's biggest advertiser. Pak'N Save advertising made up about $13.6 million of the grocery co-operative's total ad spend, a drop from $18 million for the year before.

    New World made up the bulk of the company's ad spend. Foodstuffs controls around 55 per cent of the country's supermarkets, including New World, Four Square and On The Spot outlets.

    Big spender

    Foodstuffs, which owns Pak'N Save, spent about $74 million on advertising in the year to June 30
    $26.2m was on newspapers
    $23.4m was on mailers
    $17.6m was on TV
    $7m was on radio
    * Source: Nielsen Media Research advertising information services

    Mother Bear

    Try to bloom wherever you are planted.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. How to make the most of your supermarket chook
    By MotherBear in forum The Coffee House
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 14-08-2006, 01:08 PM
  2. Supermarket
    By Pulsarblu in forum General NZ Chat
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 23-01-2006, 06:11 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46