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Thread: Teaching in NZ

  1. #1
    mikesalmon is offline Junior Member
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    Default Teaching in NZ

    hi everyone,

    I was wondering what all the rules and regulations are about getting some kind of job in education (primary school teacher). I will be coming over in about a year on a working holiday visa with full intentions of applying for permanent residency. Any advice?

    Thanks,
    Mike

  2. #2
    MotherBear's Avatar
    MotherBear is offline The missing link
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    Default Teaching in NZ

    I think I?ve read it somewhere that to teach in NZ you have to be registered there and possibly have had a years? experience. If I?ve got it wrong I?m sure someone will put me right. Perhaps it varies with the level of schooling you want to get into.
    Mother Bear

    Try to bloom wherever you are planted.

  3. #3
    MotherBear's Avatar
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    Default Teaching in NZ

    [color=green:68e63bb1fa]Sounds like they could do with your help, Mike.[/color:68e63bb1fa]

    [color=olive:68e63bb1fa][b:68e63bb1fa]Alarming morale crisis spreads among teachers[/b:68e63bb1fa] [/color:68e63bb1fa]
    03.05.06
    By Stuart Dye

    Teachers are a fractured workforce, with some reporting their colleagues are lazy, incompetent and uninterested while others are buckling under workloads and unruly classes. A report to the Ministry of Education warns of retention problems as teachers say they are overloaded, inadequately rewarded, undervalued and insufficiently supported. And it forecasts recruiting difficulties as the next generation spurns a career in teaching, seeing it as "underpaid, stressful and too ordinary".

    The report is part of a wider project to promote teaching as the country faces shortages in secondary subjects such as maths, science, Maori and technology. Called "Perceptions of Teachers and Teaching", it illustrates how those in the industry believe they are seen and highlights recruiting and retention issues.

    Education Minister Steve Maharey said it reflected a paradox in that "everyone liked their individual teacher, but as a group, they are not given the same level of respect". Debbie Te Whaiti, head of the Post-Primary Teachers Association, said any workplace would have similar fractures when it came to feedback on colleagues? performance.

    Many in the study singled out a perception that they had an easy life, with short hours and long holidays, as an example of misunderstandings surrounding their jobs. Ironically, it comes after a report by Research Solutions into the wider community?s perceptions of teaching, which revealed that most people respected the job teachers did, and felt the long holidays were a fair balance against a large workload and unruly classes. But the latest study, by Massey University, found that teachers felt they were battling against an "accumulating lack of respect" from Government, students, parents and the public.

    The report, commissioned by the Teachers Council and the Ministry of Education, was based on questionnaires and interviews with teachers, principals, students, trustees and student teachers. It found that the majority were passionate about the core aspect of their job. But their commitment was eroded by factors such as a lack of respect, bad student behaviour and low pay - leading to retention problems.

    According to Ministry of Education figures, about 6000 teachers leave each year, mainly to go overseas or to take maternity leave. Meanwhile, about 7000 enter the profession annually, made up of newly qualified teachers and those returning from their OE. However, the report warned that many stayed in the profession because they could see no alternative, which could affect the quality of their teaching.

    "There was reasonably widespread concern reported by teachers that some colleagues within their ranks are lazy, incompetent and disinterested," the report said. "There is evidence teaching is a fractured workforce." This was having a knock-on effect to students who viewed "less than capable and certainly unhappy teachers trapped in teaching". "Senior students have provided a clear message that they are not attracted to teaching, in spite of their interest in working with children."

    Mr Maharey said Government work was targeting raising professional standards, which included increased salaries, professional development and awards for excellence. There had been a lot of change in the past 20 years. "It?s a tough job, but in terms of teaching and leadership we have among the best in the world. We need to get that message out to turn perception around."

    Ms Te Whaiti said the industry needed people with a genuine vocational commitment to young people. The wider community and education agencies had to work together to provide the kind of school environment they wanted. "The reality is teaching is hugely rewarding and hugely challenging."

    The report suggested teaching had to be promoted as a "cutting edge" job, making an important contribution to society, and the value of teachers needed to be explicit. Teachers should not be defensive about their holidays, but should embrace and acknowledge them to emphasise the flexibility and opportunity to do other things.


    SECONDARY TEACHING

    Starting salary: $39,425

    Holidays: About 13 weeks annually

    Hours: About 20 in the classroom

    Classroom release time: 5 hours a teacher a week

    Average hours worked per week: 53

    Extra-curricular: Parents and reports evenings, staff meetings and most schools expect teachers to help in at least some sports or cultural activities

    Benefits include: Training allowances, student loan support, professional development, relocation grants and salary incentives for unpopular areas
    Mother Bear

    Try to bloom wherever you are planted.

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