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Thread: Bottoms up!

  1. #1
    MotherBear's Avatar
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    Default Bottoms up!

    [b:9bff1bf59e][color=darkred:9bff1bf59e]New Zealanders drinking more [/color:9bff1bf59e][/b:9bff1bf59e]
    24 February 2006

    New Zealanders are drinking more, a Statistics New Zealand report said yesterday. During 2005, the total volume of alcoholic beverages available for consumption rose 3.2 per cent, an increase of 14.1 million litres, on the previous year. Beer, wine and spirits all rose in volume. Beer accounted for nearly 69 per cent of the total, rising 1 per cent. Wine increased 6.5 per cent and was 19.5 per cent of the total. Spirit-based drinks rose 16 per cent, and represented nearly 12 per cent of the total.

    Alcohol Healthwatch director Rebecca Williams said the increase in consumption was a seven-year trend and placed the blame squarely on policy makers. The rise, she said, coincided with a drop in the proportion of the population that consumed most of the alcohol, those aged 15 to 39 years. "Quite simply drinkers are drinking more." A major factor was the lower drinking age "which added the 18 and 19 year old drinkers to the mix in 1999".

    The big rise in spirit based drinks was also likely to be driven by the younger drinking population, particularly with young women who tended towards RTDs (ready-to-drinks).

    Ms Williams said broadcast advertising and the growth of alcohol sponsorship and other marketing strategies was a key factor, and made a mockery of industry claims that advertising does not influence consumption.

    "Mature adults have to get over the fact that they themselves may not be influenced by these factors and consider the impact that they have on children and adolescents in their formative years."
    Mother Bear

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  2. #2
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    Daisyspop is offline Senior Member
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    Default Bottoms up!

    The time has come for all those heavy drinkers from the Uk to own up to this statistical tilt!

  3. #3
    Glenda's Avatar
    Glenda is offline All Knowing Deity
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    Default Bottoms up!

    Hey!

    We're not all alco ... alcologgics ... alcohollies ... (hic) :icon_wink:

    Seriously, I do hope it doesn't mean large numbers of NZ youth getting drunk, throwing up, fighting or collapsing in the streets ... something that sticks in my mind to be common in the UK these days.

    [smilie=drunks.gif]
    Glenda
    In NZ since June 2005
    Better to light a candle than to curse the darkness - Chinese proverb

  4. #4
    tottefan is offline Senior Member
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    Default Bottoms up!

    Alcohol consumption figures don't mean a thing.

    During the Victorian era, alcohol consumption per person was roughly 3 times more than it is today. That doesn't mean, however, that there was more drunkenness in those days. People probably didn't binge drink or consume alcohol all in one go like they do now. Likewise with other European countries, where alcohol consumption per person is approximately the same as the UK (some have even higher), but they don't binge drink like we do.

    My point is - it's not how much people drink per week/year - it's how they drink. Binge drinking is what causes most of the trouble, especially if it's in a public place. If people mainly drink indoors it's obviously different as well.


    Tottefan.

  5. #5
    MotherBear's Avatar
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    [color=darkred:c058fc4580][b:c058fc4580]Teens face ban on takeaway alcohol [/b:c058fc4580][/color:c058fc4580]
    16.03.06
    By Audrey Young

    The legal age for buying alcohol to take away could be raised to 20 while the drinking age remains at 18, in a bid to reduce the impact of alcohol on young people. The option of having different purchase and drinking ages emerged yesterday when MPs considered a law change to reverse the 1999 move that lowered the drinking age from 20 to 18. The bill's sponsor, Hamilton West MP Martin Gallagher, agreed that raising the purchase age was an option he expected the law and order select committee to explore. Any change could only come after a conscience vote.

    University researcher Dr Kypros Kypri urged the MPs to lift the drinking age as well, on the basis of evidence showing a direct relationship between the minimum purchase and drinking age and crash injuries to young people. The bill was introduced by former MP Matt Robson because of widespread concern that the reduction in the drinking age has led to alcohol abuse by minors as young as 14 and 15.

    Last May, the Herald reported doctors' views that allowing 18-year-olds to buy alcohol was a failed experiment that had harmed teenagers. They linked the lowered age to rising rates of sexually transmitted infections, teen pregnancy, young alcohol overdose cases at hospitals, youth binge drinking, violence and under-18s illegally drinking in public. A submission yesterday by the chairman of the Liquor Licensing Authority, Judge Edward Unwin, suggested that the problem of alcohol abuse by minors did not lie with licensed premises such as pubs and clubs, but with purchases from off-licence outlets.

    "I suggest that any concerns about the issue of abuse might relate more to the purchase of liquor and its subsequent consumption in homes, cars and public places rather than the presence of minors on licensed premises."

    Australia had differential purchasing and drinking ages, the judge said.

    Waitakere MP Lynn Pillay said most young people who went to clubs could not afford alcoholic drinks and went there to socialise and dance. Judge Unwin was highly complimentary about the management of licensed premises in New Zealand after nearly five years in the job. "My overall impression is that the great majority of commercial premises are responsibly and professionally managed," he said. "Very few licensees willingly sell liquor to minors."

    The committee asked Dr Kypri to give evidence after an article he wrote appeared in the American Journal of Public Health. A senior lecturer at Newcastle University in Australia, he also works at Otago University's Injury Prevention Research Unit. Research on alcohol-related crashes before and after the age was lowered indicated that there was an increased risk of a crash injury in the 15-to-17-year-old and 18-to-19-year-old age groups since the law change, relative to other age groups. He said it might be that setting the drinking age at 20 "disenfranchises young people", but this was a better option than being dead or disabled.

    Dr Kypri urged MPs not to be "duped" by rhetoric such as New Zealand needing to change the "drinking culture", as if that was not determined by the availability, cost and promotion of alcohol. He was critical of liquor education: "Overwhelming evidence shows no beneficial effect of education and persuasion programmes in terms of risk behaviour or injury outcome."

    [b:c058fc4580]Teens and drink [/b:c058fc4580]

    * 299 15-to-19-year-old drivers have had fatal or injury crashes on average in each of the past three years
    * 27% of teenagers say they have ridden in a car with a potentially drunk driver at least once in the past month.
    Mother Bear

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  6. #6
    DawnMarron is offline Oh Masterful One
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    Default Bottoms up!

    We have a holiday cottage here in the middle of good ole Robin Hoods Sherwood Forest and a few years ago we had some Australians staying. They were shocked at the amount of young people, obviously under-age, we have drinking openly on the streets, they said it made them feel vulnerable and at risk of abuse. Compared to Australia, they felt it was some kind of epidemic.

    Mind you, they also felt that overall the country they had saved up for years to come over and explore had let them down on numerous fronts. They thought the people were rude, bad mannered, insular, unfriendly and unapproachable and that was just staff in the 'hospitality' industry! They thought it was dirty, littered, smelly and that people had little respect for the often beautiful environment they lived in and the councils did very little to clean up after them. They thought it was seedy and trashy with a low morality and a definate feeling of pessimism.

    It made me ashamed to be British, well more ashamed to be British to be honest.

  7. #7
    MotherBear's Avatar
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    Default Bottoms up!

    Don?t you feel that, while we run the country down and know its failings, it really hurts when outsiders tell you the same things? Brings it home that what we?re saying MUST be correct and not just us being picky. Even more hurtful is the thought that they're taking these negative impressions back with them to their own country and, no doubt, relating them to others.
    Mother Bear

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  8. #8
    DawnMarron is offline Oh Masterful One
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    Default Bottoms up!

    MB, to be honest, I think that no matter where I lived I would find something that disappointed me, not many things happen that I don't have an opinion on (God help me if they did!). But, y know it's all about the kids, and we should be doin wot we can and going that extra mile to make sure that they grow with the strongest inner feelings about whats right and wrong. In my opinion that is there biggest security blanket, when inner alarm bells start ringing they need the confidence to listen and ask questions about whether they're doing the right thing or not and as parents we need the confidence in our kids to know that they are expressing honest concerns. Few parents give their kids the credit they deserve because few adults are able to express and accept how they truly feel, perhaps childrens honesty is threatening somehow. Children are amazing, they're forthright and outspoken and more often do see the wood for the trees. We should speak less and listen more :icon_redface:

  9. #9
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    Default Bottoms up!

    [smilie=amen sign.gif] to that

    Well said Dawn, I thouroughly agree =D>

  10. #10
    MotherBear's Avatar
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    Default Bottoms up!

    [color=darkred:6d2ed0559c][b:6d2ed0559c]NZ teens among worst binge-drinkers in world[/b:6d2ed0559c] [/color:6d2ed0559c]
    07.04.06 10.00am

    An alcohol advisory official has called for changes to the country's drinking culture after a survey revealed New Zealand teens are among the highest binge drinkers in the world.

    The survey also showed during the past four weeks 69 per cent of 18-to-19-year-old females drank to excess compared to 68 per cent of males.

    Alcohol Advisory Council (ALAC) chief executive Mike MacAvoy said the latest statistics were frightening.

    About 125,000 teenagers under 17 fell into the category of binge drinkers, with 75,000 drinking once every two weeks and 50,000 at least once a week with the intention of getting drunk, the Southland Times reported today.

    "We seriously need to change our drinking culture," Mr MacAvoy told the newspaper.

    The survey also revealed police were called out to an alcohol-related incident every five-and-half minutes.

    - NZPA
    Mother Bear

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