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Thread: NZ's oldest immigrant

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    Default NZ's oldest immigrant

    Nicky alerted me to this yesterday.

    102-year-old Brit moving to New Zealand
    | Friday, 04 January 2008

    A 102-year-old retired dentist looks set to become New Zealand's oldest immigrant when he quits Britain tomorrow to start a new life in Nelson.

    Eric King-Turner has packed up all his belongings to sail to the other side of the world with his 87-year-old, New Zealand-born wife Doris, the Daily Mail newspaper reported.

    He departs tomorrow, on the Saga Rose cruise ship which will dock in Auckland on February 16.

    Mr King-Turner, who lives in the village of Titchfield, near Southampton, said he was looking forward to a British way of life in a country which is not as crowded.

    Mrs King-Turner, who still has a house near Nelson, has been living in England since marrying her husband 12 years ago.

    Mr King-Turner, who was Surgeon Commander on the aircraft carrier HMS Indomitable during World War 2, said: "I think Doris has been a little bit homesick but has never complained.

    "I like New Zealand. The way of life is very much the same as it is here but it is not so crowded and the weather is certainly better.

    "I'm an Englishman through and through and there will be things I miss such as my friends but New Zealanders are very easy to get on with."

    He said he will also be able to engage in his passion for fly fishing: "New Zealand is the most wonderful place in the world for fishing.

    "It's a wonderful new adventure and I would say to anyone that if you want to do something you should do it straight away while you can.

    "I may well be Britain's oldest emigrant but being in the Guinness Book of Records is not important to me.

    "What's important is that when I'm 105 I don't want to be thinking `I wish I had moved to the other side of the world when I was 102'."

    The couple, who were both widowed, married in New Zealand in 1995 before returning to Mr King-Turner's home in the south of England.

    Mrs King-Turner, who has five children and nine grandchildren, said: "I am looking forward to getting back to my garden which is about three-quarters of an acre."

    Mrs King-Turner sponsored her husband's application to emigrate to New Zealand.

    He said: "The paperwork has taken about five months.

    "We not only had to produce a marriage certificate but we had to produce evidence that we were in a long and stable relationship!

    "I'm also pleased to say I'm in good health, they would not let me in otherwise.

    "Now I am looking forward to refurbishing my wife's home out there because that kind of thing is always fun."

    Mr King-Turner said he was not quizzed about his age but had to show he had the financial means to live when he got to New Zealand and that people would look after him if he ran out of money.

    The couple will not be putting their feet up when they land in New Zealand. They are already planning to extend the bungalow.

    The couple met after Mrs King-Turner decided to research her family history and her daughter, Adrienne, who already lived in England, contacted Mr King-Turner.

    Although they shared a surname, they were not related but she and her husband decided to keep in touch with Mr King-Turner and his wife and visited them in 1981.

    Mr King-Turner's wife Joan died in 1991 and Doris's husband invited him to stay during a fishing trip to New Zealand in 1993.

    She added: "But shortly before Eric's arrival on Christmas Eve 1993, my husband Lewis sadly died too".

    She still met the Briton at the airport, and he extended his fortnight visit to a month, then returned in 1995.

    The couple said they had been touring the country together for two weeks when they realised they were in love and decided to marry in Alexandra.

    - NZPA

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    kokopeli is offline God like figure
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    I loved this gentleman's comment about not wanting to look back with regret when he's 105! Way to go fella!

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    I should think so, too. Isn't he great?

    Immigrant, aged 101: It would have been 'odd' if they'd thrown me out
    Page 1 of 2 .........5:00AM Tuesday February 19, 2008
    By Keith Perry


    Horace Mayes enjoys beautiful scenes of Waiheke Island from his family's clifftop home. Photo / Greg Bowker

    First, Horace Mayes got a 100th birthday card from the Prime Minister. Then immigration authorities told him he was being kicked out of the country.

    The shocked centenarian only avoided becoming the oldest person to be removed from New Zealand after embarrassed Government ministers performed a dramatic u-turn and allowed him to stay.

    Yesterday, Mr Mayes, 101, spoke of his delight at being able to stay in the country he has been visiting for Christmas holidays since 1979.

    Until last week, the former research chemist feared he would suffer the indignity of being sent back to Britain "on a technicality" despite having sold his Sussex home.

    But immigration officials softened their hardline stance following the intervention of Immigration Minister Clayton Cosgrove, who asked them to take another look at the case.

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    Mother Bear

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    No regrets as oldest newcomer turns 103
    By GREER McDONALD - The Dominion Post | Tuesday, 05 August 2008

    He is another year older, but New Zealand's oldest immigrant Eric King-Turner - now 103 - still uses the internet to keep in touch with his homeland.

    Doris King-Turner told The Dominion Post yesterday that, despite the winter weather, she and her gregarious husband were happy to be living in New Zealand, after more than 13 years together in England.

    "There are no regrets," she said, speaking from their home in Mapua, near Motueka.

    "It's a lovely spot, it's quite sheltered and we have a nice rural outlook."

    Since their arrival in Wellington aboard the Saga Rose cruise ship in February, Mr King-Turner has kept in touch with family and friends in Britain using e-mail.

    His move to New Zealand at the sprightly age of 102 reportedly made him this country's oldest immigrant, and the media hype around his arrival made him something of a celebrity among his fellow travellers.

    He said at the time that the secret to a long life "is animal fats, butter, sugar, salt and gin - all things we're not supposed to have".

    There were no plans to take things easy when he spoke to The Dominion Post in February. "I don't want to put my feet up at all."

    But the winter weather has prevented Mr King-Turner from enjoying his much-loved trout fishing, and yesterday he was at home recovering from a virus, his wife said.

    Their round-the-world trip to New Zealand was smooth sailing, and they were reminded of that when they saw footage of the horror trip of the Pacific Sun cruise ship last week.

    "It was just dreadful," she said. "It was nothing like our trip."

    The couple were befriended by the captain of the Saga Rose, who has invited them to lunch with him when the ship docks in Wellington again, in February.

    From here.
    Mother Bear

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